Spring 2016 Honors Seminars

Seminar Registration for Spring Semester begins: November 18th NOON

WARNING! 

If you try to register for seminars before that day and time, you will be unable to add the class. Also, the system will exclude you from the wait list after the class is full. If openings become available after a seminar is full, Honors staff will contact those on the wait list.

Reference numbers will be posted a couple of days prior to registration.

Make sure you plan ahead and take the number of required Honors courses and seminars as prescribed by your college Honors committee. Don't wait until your last year to meet the requirements because you may find that you will have some scheduling conflicts.

Important: Attendance at Honors seminars is expected. Be sure to read the entire seminar description and requirements. Be courteous and notify your instructor in advance if you are unable to attend class.

Check back regularly for updates.

  • HON 322AComedy College
  • HON 322BView for a Few: An Up Close and Personal Look at the Criminal Justice System
  • HON 322CJack the Ripper
  • HON 322DHow to think about Weird Things: "Science," "Evidence," and Beyond
  • HON 322EScience Communication Secrets: Beyond Speaking
  • HON 322FThey Do What? Examining Stereotypes and Perspectives
  • HON 322GStudies in Global Warming
  • HON 322HFrom Buffy to Wonder Woman: Exploring the Heroic Women of Pop Culture
  • HON 322J, BZService-Learning in Punta Gorda, Belize
  • HON 322J, UKHere, There and Everywhere: A Beatles Retrospective with London Experience
  • HON 322KHere, There and Everywhere: A Beatles Retrospective
  • HON 322LGraphic Memoirs: Comic Books with History CANCELED
  • HON 322MImprovisational Comedy
  • HON 322NMoney Management
  • HON 322PFeminism and Film
  • HON 322QHuman Trafficking in the United States
  • HON 322RMedia and Religion in American History
  • HON 322SEpigenetics Why What Your Grandpa Ate May Affect Your Health
  • HON 322TUnplugged
  • HON 322UConflicts in the Middle East
  • HON 322VThat's Me in The Corner
  • HON 322WLessons from Positive Psychology on Happiness and Success
  • HON 322YHarry Potter: A Retrospective
  • HON 322ZMythbusting in Psychology
  • HON 323AEngaged Citizenship

    HON 322A, Comedy College, Wednesday, 5:10-7:00 p.m., 2 credits, Enrollment limit: 16, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: In this seminar, you will learn to be funnier. Humor is not a mystical process of divine intervention granted by the Comedy Gods to a chosen few. There are tricks, techniques and theories that when studied, can make a person funnier. When put into practice, these skills can help with self-confidence, public speaking, and communication skills. While some reading and watching of stand-up routines is required, the majority of class focus will be on creating and sharing original humor with your classmates. The seminar culminates in a live, stand-up comedy showcase where each student will share his or her new-found humor skills with the world. Unlike the new Improvisational Comedy seminar, which focuses on ensemble comedy, this seminar focuses on the individual, standup performance.

    About the Instructor: Gavin Jerome has been a professional entertainer for well over 20 years. He has worked with the likes of Jerry Seinfeld, Paul Reiser and Steve Harvey. For the past decade, Gavin has been providing humor workshops for companies and associations nationwide. His extensive standup comedy experience plus many years of leading workshops on humor in the workplace make him most qualified on creating and sharing comedy. Peter Orazem, University Professor of Economics, has been a student of Gavin’s, and is known around campus for his entertainment skills.

     

    HON 322B, View for a Few: An Up Close and Personal Look at the Criminal Justice System, 1st Half Wednesday, 4:10-6:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: Have you wondered what attorneys look for when picking a jury? Have you ever wished to venture inside a jail? Have you wondered what the criminal justice system looks like from the perspective of a victim? This hands-on seminar will examine these subjects, as well as assist you in developing a better grasp of the intricate workings of the court process, allow you to identify the courtroom players, and examine a case from the initiation of a charge through its disposition. It is anticipated that the class will take 1-2 field trips over the course of the half-semester, hear first-hand from individuals working in the field (attorneys/officers/advocates), and review films based on fictional and real cases. Reading materials will be provided in class.

    About the Instructor: Mary Howell Sirna is the Administrative Advisor to Iowa State’s Police Department. She regularly trains and delivers legal updates to the department’s officers and provides outreach to the university and outside agencies regarding domestic violence, sexual assault, report writing, and legal standards for criminal and university proceedings. She was previously First Assistant in the Story County Attorney’s Office (SCAO) for 13 years. During her tenure as a prosecutor, she specialized in victim cases including, domestic abuse, sexual abuse, child abuse and homicide. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College and University of Iowa College of Law, she previously co-taught Honors seminar on this topic and on “Street Law.”

     

    HON 322C, Jack the Ripper – 125 Year History, Friday, 1:10-2:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment Limit 17, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: For more than 125 years we have been intrigued by the puzzle of the 1888 Whitechapel murders. What is it about this specific crime that continues to captivate the world? Who did it? During this seminar we will take an historical look at the mysterious Jack the Ripper and the victims. You’ll be assigned a book covering the four major areas of the Ripper murders – the victims, evidence/letters, suspects, and investigators – and will write a weekly synopsis on each week’s topic. Using theses synopses and class debates, we’ll discuss various theories, suspects, or critical pieces of evidence, focusing on the who and why of the mystery.

    About the Instructor: Laurie Smith Law, Administrative Director of the University Honors Program, has worked with high ability students for many years and has taught several honors seminars. She has offered seminars on culture through celebrations, urban language and social discussion. With a background in student affairs and learning communities, Ms. Law has also traveled with ISU students on alternative spring break programs in Mexico and Belize.

     

    HON 322D, How to Think about Weird Things: “Science,” “Evidence,” and Beyond, Monday 2:10-3:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit 17, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: In this seminar we will use the book How to Think about Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age to evaluate claims of “evidence,” “truth,” “fact,” and “science,” and consider how we use these concepts in our daily lives. We will explore aspects of the functioning nervous system, critical thinking, decision-making, experience, cognitive processing, and interrelated aspects of human critical thought. In addition to joining in reading and classroom activities, you’ll write a paper on any aspect of class discussion and provide a discussion/narrative on the subject by the end of term.

    About the Instructor: Dr. Rod Bagley is the Chair of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and the author of more than 200 scientific articles, abstracts and book chapters related to neurology, neurosurgery, and internal medicine. A Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery, he served previously as Executive Director of the Veterinary Medical Center (Teaching Hospital) at Iowa State’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Bagley also coordinates the medical communication component of the veterinary professional curriculum. A certified trainer in “Crucial Conversations,” he has trained many ISU employees in this communication model. His scholarly focus is in cognitive educational understanding and enhancement.

     

    HON 322E, Science Communication Secrets: Beyond Speaking Clearly, 2nd Half, Monday 3:10-5:00 p.m.,1 credit, Enrollment limit 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: Climate change, evolution, genetically modified crops, “pink slime,” nuclear power, vaccines… How should scientists communicate to the public about such controversial topics? Even if the science is accurate, what buried landmines can scientists unknowingly step on that may cause their communication to blow up in their faces? This seminar will use case studies of actual events and a debate format to explore some of the unwritten rules of science communication, and what can happen when scientists cross these hidden lines.

    About the Instructor: Michael Dahlstrom, an Associate Professor in the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication, works with colleagues from social science, humanities and STEM fields to explore the complex communicative interactions among scientists and the public. His current research focuses on the effects of narrative structures on science perceptions and the biases inherent when attempting to perceive scientific topics beyond human scale. Clark Wolf, Director of Bioethics and Professor of Philosophy, publishes on political theory, philosophy of law, and ethics. His recent papers address issues in environmental law, sustainability, and science ethics.

     

    HON 322F, They Do What? Examining Stereotypes and Perspectives 1st Half, Monday 12:10-2:00 p.m., 1 credit, U.S. Diversity Credit, Enrollment limit: 17, 3158 Pearson, Ref. No.

    Description: In this course, we will examine our cultural myths, stereotypes and realities and in turn, compare our views with the way others live in their worlds and how they perceive ours. You will learn to question and compare cultures in a systematic way by examining four perspectives: How we see ourselves, How we see them, How they see themselves, and How they see us.

    About the Instructor: Cristina Pardo Ballester, Associate Professor of Spanish in the World Languages and Cultures Department, received a Ph.D. in Hispanic Linguistics from University of California, Davis. She teaches many courses in Spanish at the 300 level. Cultural understanding and awareness form part of each course she teaches. As a language teacher, Dr. Pardo Ballester has a strong interest in this topic.

     

    HON 322G, Studies in Global Warming, Thursday, 1:10-2:00 p.m., 1 credit, International Perspectives credit, Enrollment 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: Global warming is a major economic, political and environmental issue. There is little doubt that the earth is warming up. The critical questions are: why is the earth warming, and what are the effects of this warming on ecosystems, agriculture, human population and economic growth? A parallel set of questions concerns what we can do about global warming, technological and economic strategies for reducing its impact, time scales for the technological and economic changes needed, and kinds of adaptation required if the earth continues to warm at an accelerated rate. In this seminar, we will explore these questions by reading about global warming and strategies to overcome or cope with it in both OECD countries and in developing economies. You will lead discussions on your readings and make a presentation at the end of the seminar on some aspect of this topic.

    About the Instructor: Professor Vikram Dalal is Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Whitney Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He teaches courses related to photovoltaic energy conversion, energy systems, and semiconductor physics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. He is a fellow of American Physical Society, IEEE and American Association for Advancement of Science, having been recognized by all three organizations for the excellence of his research on solar energy conversion. He has 19 years of industrial research experience, and has taught at Iowa State since 1988.

     

    HON 322H, From Buffy to Wonder Woman: Exploring the Heroic Women of Pop Culture, Thursday, 5:10-6:00 p.m., 1 credit, U.S. Diversity credit, Enrollment limit 17, 145 Bessey, Ref. No.

    Description: From Wonder Woman to Katniss, images and representations of the female hero of pop culture have evolved over the last seven decades. Women in heroic roles are now found in comic books and graphic novels, video games, television shows, and films. Using the book Ink-stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology as our backdrop, we will explore and critique the representation of the female hero in modern myth. We will cover topics like the birth of modern mythology, spy girls and B-movie vixens, the feminism of Joss Whedon, and why G.I. Jane may not be a feminist icon. This class will also use film, television, and graphic novels as background references to class discussions.

    About the Instructor: Jacki Hayes received her M.S. in Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies from Iowa State in 2012. Her post-graduate program focused on Religious Studies, Women’s Studies, and Psychology, and concluded with an examination of the female comic book super heroes as goddesses of a modern mythology. She has since taught Goddess Spirituality and Women and Religion for the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.

     

    HON 322J, BZ, Service-Learning in Punta Gorda, Belize, Thursday, 4:10-6:00 p.m., 2 credits, International Perspectives Credit, Enrollment limit: 10-15, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: You may have come to the university with some language skills and/or trips to international destinations in high school. In this seminar, you’ll be able to gain or build on such experiences by learning about and traveling to Punta Gorda, Belize, for a service-learning experience. Through this semester-long course, you’ll explore learning about and doing service in Belize. You’ll apply new understanding and reflect on how these experiences affect the five dimensions of culture (products, practices, persons, perspectives, and communities). We will use Linda Chisholm’s Charting a Hero’s Journey (International Partnership for Service-Learning Press, 2000). Other readings will be provided.

    About the Instructor: Laurie Smith Law, Administrative Director of the University Honors Program, has been working with high-ability students for several years and has taught Honors seminars on culture through celebrations, urban language, and social discussion. With a background in student affairs, she has worked with several learning community programs. She is familiar with service-learning programs and has previously supervised students on alternative spring break programs.

     

    HON 322K, Here, There and Everywhere: A Beatles Retrospective, 1 credit No travel, class only 
    HON 322K UK - Here, There and Everywhere: A Beatles Retrospective with London, Tuesday, 6:10-8:00 p.m., 1st Half, 2 credits, Enrollment limit: 17, 2030 Morrill, Ref. No.

    Description: The Beatles have influenced generations of musicians and music fans since their first album was released in 1963. This seminar will explore the compiled works of The Beatles’ albums, TV appearances, and movies. You will survey 1960’s culture through the lens of a Beatles album and explore how Beatles music and the band’s personalities helped shape a generation’s understanding of Eastern religion, recreational drug use, and the 60’s counter-culture. This course may be taken for one credit, or as a two-credit course that includes a Spring Break trip to London and Liverpool.

    About the Instructor: Jennifer Leptien has a Ph. D in Human Development and Family Studies. She currently serves as a program coordinator for the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching and the Learning Communities program at Iowa State. An avid music fan, she has a particular affinity for the Beatles and is excited to share her passion for “the greatest band of all time” through this Honors seminar.

     

    HON 322L,Graphic Memoirs: Comic Books with History, Tuesday, 11:00-11:50 a.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit: 17, Carver, Ref. No.

    CANCELED

     

    HON 322M, Improvisational Comedy, 1st Half, Tuesday, 3:40-5:40 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit 16, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: This seminar will begin with discussions about comedy: What makes things funny? Why do we laugh? Then, we will create an ensemble to learn the techniques of, and experiment with, group improvisational comedy. During each two-hour session, you will engage in collaborative exercises and learn skills that not only prepare you to perform improv comedy in front of an audience, but also promote confidence and creativity. We’ll work hard, but we’ll also have fun—and, hopefully, we’ll be funny. The successful Comedy College seminar focuses on the solo comic; this seminar is all about ensemble comedy, a form of performance that is highly collaborative and team-oriented.

    About the Instructor: Dr. Charissa Menefee is a playwright, director, and performer. Currently on the faculty of the MFA Program in Creative Writing & Environment, she does research on the intersections of writing and performance, including new play development. At Iowa State, she has taught scriptwriting, acting, writing as performance, public speaking, and dramatic literature. She has been teaching comedy for more than twenty years.

     

    HON 322N, Money Management, 1st Half, Tuesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit 24, 3164 Gerdin, Ref. No.

    Description: This course is designed to help you acquire sound money management skills. It will include a series of seminars featuring experts in the field of finance. You will have an opportunity to directly interact with these finance professionals and to learn from their lectures. Our objective is help you learn to effectively manage student loans and credit card debt, create balanced budgets, develop good saving habits, identify profitable investment options, and follow proper risk management strategies. The last 30 minutes of each session are open for discussion and questions.

    About the Instructor: Shoba Premkumar, a Senior Lecturer in the College of Business, will coordinate this seminar. Guest speakers include Tom Coates, CEO, Consumer Credit of Des Moines; Chad Olson, Assistant Director, Office of Student Financial Aid, ISU; Rick Reger, agent for American National Insurance Co.; Jake Zehr, Wealth Management Advisor, TIAA-CREF; and Mitch Peterson, Branch Manager, Stifel Nicholas & Co.

     

    HON 322P, Feminism and Film, Wednesday, 5:10-7:00 p.m., 2 credits, U.S. Diversity credit, Morrill, Ref. No.

    Description: Feminism is a misunderstood topic in today’s society. By viewing and discussing films with feminist themes, you will learn to investigate what feminism is and how it can have an impact on our everyday life. You will also be able to create your own definition of feminism. The films vary in time periods, emphasis on specific identities (gender, race, etc.), and genre. We will watch a film one week, and discuss the film the following week in small groups. You will also read articles about feminism in order to supplement content in discussion groups.

    About the Instructor: Alissa Stoehr is a Lecturer in the Women's and Gender Studies Program. Her research interests include human trafficking, child support and welfare policies in the state of Iowa, racism within intercollegiate athletics, work-life balance of female Ph.D. students at Iowa State, and women’s and gender studies programs at community colleges. Alissa has taught WS 160: Gender Justice, WS 201: Introduction to Women’s Studies, WS 205: Introduction to Queer Studies, H SCI 150: Dialogues on Diversity, and various Honors seminars on human trafficking and reproductive rights.

     

    HON 322Q, Human Trafficking in the United States, Wednesday, 10:00-10:50 a.m., 1 credit, U.S. Diversity, Enrollment limit 17, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: In this seminar we will explore the phenomenon of human trafficking within the United States. You will learn about the history of, and concepts that define, human trafficking; how race, gender, nationality, etc., affect human trafficking; and how you can make a difference in your community by educating peers about this crime against humanity. Possible guest speakers include representatives from the Network Against Human Trafficking, Youth and Shelter Services, and a survivor of human trafficking.

    About the Instructor: Alissa Stoehr is a Lecturer in the Women's and Gender Studies Program. Her research interests include human trafficking, child support and welfare policies in the state of Iowa, racism within intercollegiate athletics, work-life balance of female Ph.D. students at Iowa State, and women’s and gender studies programs at community colleges. Alissa has taught WS 160: Gender Justice, WS 201: Introduction to Women’s Studies, WS 205: Introduction to Queer Studies, H SCI 150: Dialogues on Diversity, and various Honors seminars on human trafficking and reproductive rights.

     

    HON 322R, Media and Religion in American History, Wednesday, 2:10-4:00 p.m., 2 credits, U.S. Diversity credit, Enrollment limit 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: Media content and religious ideas have been powerful and ever-present from the beginning of American history. How do they influence us, especially when they work together? How have news media, novels, movies, and TV programs used and altered religious ideas and images? How have Americans used media to practice their religions, discover new ideas, and build spiritual communities? Why are religious institutions usually among the first to adopt new media technologies? This seminar will explore those questions as we discuss the writings of thoughtful scholars and journalists about the connections between media and religion.

    About the Instructor: Andrew D. Pritchard is an assistant professor in the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication. He is a lawyer and award-winning former journalist who received his Ph.D. from North Dakota State University and a J.D. from the University of Minnesota. His research and teaching focus on media law and ethics, media history, issues of media and religion, and journalism practice.

     

    HON 322S, Epigenetics – Why What Your Grandpa Ate May Affect Your Health, Wednesday, 11:00-11:50 a.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit: 17, MacKay, Ref. No

    Description: In this seminar, we will gain an understanding of gene expression and how it relates to disease. More specifically, the focus will be on epigenetics – a process by which genes can be turned on and off. This process is heavily dependent on environmental factors such as diet. However, changes in gene expression can be inherited in offspring, and thus no longer modifiable, although some therapeutic strategies aim to “undo” these inherited changes. You will learn about epigenetics and read a number of articles, cases, studies, or examples of how this process affects health and disease, particularly in subsequent generations. As more and more is known about epigenetics, a bioethics component enters the conversation, and we will explore this as well.

    About the Instructor: Dr. Kevin Schalinske teaches many courses in Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN 167, 360, 367, 467), as well as in the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Nutritional Sciences, including a course on epigenetics (NUTRS 504). Dr. Schalinske has an active research laboratory that explores the role of diet, epigenetics, and disease (e.g., diabetes). He has received both the CALS and ISU Award for Outstanding Teaching, and has taught a similar Honors Seminar in the past.

     

    HON 322T, Unplugged, Tuesday, 5:10-7:00 p.m., 2nd Half, 1 credit, Enrollment: 17, 1151 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: Do you feel that you are connected – or have to be connected – to the Internet every hour of your waking day? Do you wonder whether you might be addicted to your cell phone, or about how life might have been different in the not-long-ago era before Snapchat and Twitter? In this seminar we will read about, think about, discuss, and practice the art of being unplugged. That is, we’ll read and learn about hand-made tools, low-tech farming, and the art of snail mail. We’ll decide whether unplugging, even occasionally, can improve the quality of our daily lives and relationships. Requirements: Readings and/or journal entries, occasional field trips or speakers, student-led discussions, and a creative final piece on getting or being “unplugged.” You must be willing to spend one Saturday late in the semester on a class field trip.

    About the Instructor: Susan Yager, Professor of English and Faculty Director of Honors, has taught many Honors Seminars on such topics as banned books, autism in literature and culture, and Harry Potter. She checks email frequently and occasionally posts on Facebook, but is (mainly) content to let the plugged-in world pass her by. So far, she has succeeded in not owning a cell phone.

     

    HON 322U, Conflicts in the Middle East, Wednesday, 2:10-3:00p.m., 1 credit, International Perspective Credit, Enrollment limit: 17, Pearson, Ref. No.

    Description: What are the current political conflicts in the Middle East? How should we understand the wars in the Middle East? In this seminar, we will examine the current political conflicts and wars in this region. We will examine in depth the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese War, the Palestinian question and other regional issues (Iraq, the Kurds, Iran, Syria, etc.). You will better understand the “complicated Middle East” and how these conflicts affect the war on terrorism.

    About the Instructor: Jean-Pierre Taoutel has been teaching at ISU since 1999 as a Senior Lecturer of French and an Instructor of Arabic. He was born in Syria and grew up in Lebanon before moving to France. He holds an M.A and a D.E.A in French literature from the Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris, France. He has taught several Honors seminars. Jean-Pierre enjoys traveling and he has been in over 40 countries.

     

    HON 322V, That's Me in The Corner, Monday 2:10-3:00 p.m., 1 credit, International Perspective Credit, Enrollment limit: 17, Pearson, Ref. No

    Description: How much do you know about the problems that many people in the world face today? Are you aware of the plagues (organ traffic, modern slavery, child soldiers, forced prostitution, etc.) that are destroying the lives of millions of people around you? On the first day of this seminar, you will be given a photo that represents a random person suffering from one of today’s plagues. Who is this person? What is his/her problem? How come he/she has ended up in this situation? You will do research about the issue represented in the photo and present it in class. You will learn more in-depth about issues that, even if they don’t make the headlines, affect millions of people in the world. You could have been that person in the corner!

    About the Instructor: Jean-Pierre Taoutel has been teaching at ISU since 1999 as a Senior Lecturer of French and an Instructor of Arabic. He was born in Syria and grew up in Lebanon before moving to France. He holds an M.A and a D.E.A in French literature from the Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris, France. He has taught several Honors seminars. Jean-Pierre enjoys traveling and he has been in over 40 countries.

     

    HON 322W, Lessons from Positive Psychology on Happiness and Success, Tuesday, 2:10-3:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit: 17, Carver, Ref. No.

    Description: Happiness and success are desired by nearly everyone. What is the relationship of happiness and success? How do they influence each other? This seminar draws from positive psychology and facilitates the exploration of happiness and success. The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor will serve as our primary reading. Additionally, we will experiment with and implement strategies that can promote happiness in our own lives.

    About the Instructor: Sam von Gillern is a doctoral student studying Literacy Education and Teaching English as a Second/Foreign language. He is interested in issues related to educational access and literacy development of English language learners. He has taught Curriculum and Instruction 204, Social Foundations of Education in the United States; Psychology 131, Academic Learning Skills; and Human Sciences 150, Dialogues on Diversity at Iowa State.

     

    HON 322Y, Harry Potter: A Retrospective, Monday, 5:10-6:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit: 16, 1151 Jischke, Ref. Num.

    Description: In this seminar, we will look back over the books in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series with attention to development of characters and themes. We will also consider these books as literature and as myth. We will practice some techniques of close reading, with careful attention to detail, and with attention to placing these books in the context of other literature. Class will be discussion-based with supplemental readings providing further basis for discussion. You should have already read the Potter books; we will focus on only a few.

    About the Instructor: Susan Yager, Professor of English and Faculty Director of the Honors Program, studies medieval English literature, primarily Chaucer, and is also interested in children’s literature. Susan has taught past seminars on various aspects of the Harry Potter phenomenon as well as on banned and challenged books, autism in literature and culture, learning with lectures, and other topics.

     

    HON 322Z, Mythbusting in Psychology, Wednesday, 10:10-11:50 a.m., 1 credit, Enrollment Limit: 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No

    Description: Did you ever hear the idea that we only use 10% of our brains? That you can tell people are lying by the way they move their eyes? Ever see in movies or read in popular fiction that psychologists always sleep with their patients? In this seminar, we will debunk myths that the public has about psychology, psychologists, and psychotherapy by learning about the science, facts, and truth behind these and other popular misconceptions.

    About the Instructor: Dr. James A. Pritchard is an Adjunct Associate Professor in Natural Resource Ecology and Management, with a shared appointment in Landscape Architecture. He is the author of Preserving Yellowstone’s Natural Conditions: Science and the Perception of Nature (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999).

     

    HON 324A, Engaged Citizenship, 1st Half, Thursday, 1:10-3:00 p.m., 1 credit, Enrollment limit: 17, 1155 Jischke, Ref. No.

    Description: What does it mean to be an engaged citizen? Why pursue citizen engagement? Do we have an obligation to be engaged citizens? In this seminar we will explore the elements of citizen engagement in the 21st century by examining political, service, and leadership involvement at the local, national, and global levels. We’ll also discuss the impact of the internet and social media on community involvement and citizenship. We will consider these topics through readings, discussion, and speakers, as well as reflection journals and a final project.

    About the Instructor: Ashley Overman is a second year master’s student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Program, and serves as the Honors Program’s Graduate Assistant. Before coming to Iowa State she worked for the American Red Cross in natural disaster preparedness and recovery. Ashley has interests in leadership, service, and community engagement.